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d100 Forest Finds

D100 Forest Finds

 

What’s in your forest?

A forest can be much more than a simple terrain sprinkled with occasional encounters. A forest exists whether the party is there or not and, therefore, has a life of its own. It is full of animals, creatures both mundane and fanciful, areas of magic and mystery, and places with history.

People have been through this forest before your party, and some may still be in the area. People drop the oddest things in forests.

In your game, you can break up the monotony of forest terrain travel with some of these items. Roll some dice, or just pick out something that seems like fun. Use an item below as described or apply your own twist. It can be a passing sort of thing, or you might decide to weave it into your adventure.

 

Roll 1d100!

  1. 13 straw dolls arranged around a weeping willow
  2. A broken down, abandoned tinker’s wagon
  3. A map showing the route from the nearest settlement to a spot just beyond where the map is found.
  4. A boot filled with water and a live fish.
  5. A silver medallion featuring a crescent moon.
  6. A severed hand holding a rabbit’s foot.
  7. A fairly new pair of children’s shoes.
  8. The crumbling, broken remains of an adventuring party that has been turned to stone. A dwarven warrior, elf sorceress, and human rogue are all in defensive poses.
  9. An oil lantern mounted to a post that casts Zone of Truth in a 15×15 area. Only works in this spot. Oil runs out in 8 hours.
  10. The smoldering remains of a small campfire.
  11. An assortment of small stones laid out in the shape of an arrow pointing north.
  12. An invisible tree.
  13. A large stone statue of a gargoyle facing east but pointing south.
  14. An old wagon wheel with unknown runes carved in the spokes.
  15. A wicker basket filled with edible mushrooms.
  16. A dead rabbit dressed in chainmail armor.
  17. A perfectly spherical granite stone, five feet wide, half buried in the ground. Weighs 11,230 lbs.
  18. A piece of parchment pinned to a tree with a rusty dagger. On it is the word “Run!”
  19. A large X on a large rock painted in blood.
  20. A traveler’s bedroll. It is old and moldy. Hidden between two blankets is an opal pendant on a leather string.
  21. Two empty crystal goblets and a bottle of fine red wine perched atop a tree stump.
  22. A perfectly healthy, but somewhat hungry, human baby wrapped in swaddling cloth.
  23. A deep hole, a shovel, and a wooden box with a strange looking wand inside.
  24. A wooden flute that has been snapped in half.
  25. A silhouette of a humanoid figure burned into the ground.
  26. A wanted poster with an image of one of the party members. The reward is insultingly low.
  27. A single tulip made of glass in the center of a clearing.
  28. A row of unmarked tombstones equal to the number of party members.
  29. A 10×10 iron cage. On one side, the bars have been broken and bent outward.
  30. A large iron cauldron that has been split in half. There is blast damage on the surrounding trees.
  31. Three trees with tall mirrors mounted on them and facing toward the middle.
  32. A broken beartrap. There are owlbear feathers found nearby.
  33. A four-sided wooden top. When spun, it will heal 1-4 points depending on which side is facing up when it stops spinning. Sides are unmarked, so players do not know the amount healed. Can be used three times a day.
  34. A large oak tree with five axe blades embedded in the trunk in various spots. Nonetheless, the tree looks healthy and strong.
  35. From one large oak to a large elm about fifty feet away, there is a five foot wide cobblestone road that ends at the base of each tree.
  36. A flowering mountain laurel that sneezes in the presence of a dwarf.
  37. A raven wearing a top hat and monocle is perched on a tree branch. It sees the party and says, in a loud voice, “Now I’ve seen everything!” and flies off.
  38. A bird’s nest that has toppled to the ground. Among the twigs and grass making up the neat is a locket on a chain. Within the locket is a very small uncut diamond.
  39. A glowing silver ring floating five feet in the air. When reached for, it teleports in a random direction 20 feet away. This happens 1d12 times before disappearing for good.
  40. The forest opens up to a large, hastily made clearing. There are a dozen campfire remains spread about and the signs of a large force of people having camped here. Careful investigation uncovers some abandoned personal cookware and a military style polearm. The campsite is less than a week old.
  41. A smashed lute with broken strings and a dagger plunged into the body.
  42. A tree whose branches all point west.
  43. A potters bench and a carefully cultivated bed of tea roses. The bench holds five empty clay flower pots and a small gardening trowel.
  44. Nailed to a tree, a broadsheet with the current date from a city over 200 miles away.
  45. Three dozen soap bubbles of various sizes gently floating on the breeze. They pop easily and release a pleasant rose scent which heals 1 hit point to the person closest to it and within two feet.
  46. An old tin box full of wooden buttons of various sizes.
  47. An open scroll case filled with live spiders.
  48. A 2’ x 4’ painting of an unknown mountain.
  49. A tree decorated with 100 white ribbons. Misfortune to any who removes a ribbon. The more ribbons removed, the greater misfortune.
  50. One half of a giant rat that has been split cleanly down the middle.
  51. A patch of thorns with various dead animals decomposing in it. A scratch results in 1d4 damage plus save for paralysis.
  52. An old wooden marionette of a small boy.
  53. Hanging from a branch, a clean set of traditional wedding garb for both bride and groom.
  54. A wide candle set atop a flat rock. Around the candle, runes have been scratched into the stone.
  55. The remains of a goblin hunting party that came to a bad end.
  56. An abandoned woodcutter’s hut. Sleeps two, but is in very poor condition.
  57. A seashell beneath some brush. When held up to the ear, it relays a muttered conversation between a man and a woman in an unrecognizable language.
  58. Three broken war axes.
  59. An old wheelbarrow filled with gravel. At the bottom of the gravel are the remains of a human foot.
  60. A tree that grows both apples and pears on the same branches.
  61. A signpost that reads “You are here.”
  62. A necklace with the same number of small vials of blood as the number of party members.
  63. A decomposing severed left wing of a small red dragon.
  64. A hunter’s bag with seven freshly killed rabbits.
  65. A small spring that offers refreshing drink, but once left, cannot be found again.
  66. A mound of small animal bones with a fresh, uneaten apple balanced atop it.
  67. Half buried in leaves and muck, a small mortar and pestle.
  68. A broken compass.
  69. The storm-wrecked shell of an old Norse longboat.
  70. A set of wind chimes made from finger bones hanging from a tree.
  71. A tree with a hidden panel covering a small storage space. Inside the space is a dagger, 20’ of rope ending in a noose, and a camp shovel.
  72. Two small wooden figurines of gnome warriors inside a small box lined with straw.
  73. A horse saddle with a broken strap.
  74. A horned helmet, the inside of which is coated with wet moss and small mushrooms.
  75. A rock that kind of looks like a dog.
  76. A porcelain doll of a young girl with the eyes scratched out.
  77. A 5×5 pit trap covered by a lattice of thin branches and leaves approximately 10 feet deep and lined with wooden spikes at the bottom.
  78. Twelve arrows thrust into the ground beside a broken longbow.
  79. An old faded map sticking out of a hollow in a tree that leads to buried treasure on an unknown island.
  80. A litter of kittens and a hungry momma cat.
  81. A circular area about 40’ across in which everything has been burned to ash.
  82. A surprised looking troll that has turned to stone.
  83. A cleared campsite complete with campfire ring, firewood, a trough of fresh water, and three loaves of fresh bread wrapped in thick paper and tied neatly with string.
  84. A tree that has been recently split down the middle by lightning.
  85. A low branch with a robin’s nest and three eggs. The eggs are just about to hatch and the mama robin wants you gone.
  86. A sunrise. No matter what time of day or night it is, the party suddenly experiences a beautiful sunrise for ten seconds before everything snaps back to normal time.
  87. An old canvas tarp, dirty and musty, but still in good condition.
  88. Three empty but unbroken wine bottles.
  89. A chunk of fool’s gold.
  90. An old wooden whistle that attracts bees.
  91. Some low brush from which a soft giggle can be heard, but the source not found.
  92. A stack of cut honeycombs wrapped in oil paper leaning against a large rock.
  93. The ruins of a small ancient farming village.
  94. A glass jar full of beach sand.
  95. A pile of old deer hide.
  96. An exposed field of granite crisscrossed with thick veins of quartz.
  97. A tent that has been ripped to shreds by something large and awful.
  98. An area of forest about 50’ wide absolutely covered in spider webs.
  99. A spruce tree decorated with ribbons and orbs of painted glass.
  100. A pile of newly carved wands, none of which have been finished or empowered.

Forests can be fun! What are some of your favorite forest finds? Reply in the comments.

 

 

 

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Statblock Sunday #18

Art by Tim Tyler

Create a Pathfinder Roleplaying Game statblock for this monster and get your creature published in an upcoming Adventure-A-Week adventure!

Bonus points for incorporating this monster into our campaign setting!

Every Sunday we post the picture of a monster here on the AaW Blog. Your job is to take it and build a Pathfinder Roleplaying Game statblock suitable for such a creature. Any CR is fair game. Winner may just get their statblock published within an adventure and have their name appear in the credits!

Bonus points will be awarded to those authors that tie the monster into the AaW Campaign Setting (available via Adventureaweek.com).

 

 

How to submit your statblock:

Email your properly formatted statblock to submit(at)adventureaweek.com

 

Proper Formatting:

zzMonstername CR ##
XP ##
zzAlignment zzSize zzType
Init +##; Senses zz, zz,; Perception +##
Aura zz (## ft., DC ##)

—– Defense —–
AC ##, touch ##, flat-footed # (+## zzModifier, +##zzModifier)
hp ## (##d##+##); fast healing ##
Fort +##, Ref +##, Will +##
DR ##/zzMaterial; Immune zz; Resist zz ##, zz ##;SR ##
Weaknesses zz, zz

—– Offense —–
Speed ## ft., fly ## ft. (zzManeuverability)
Melee zzAttacktype +## (zzDamage plus zzOthereffect), zzAttacktype +## (zzDamage)
Ranged zzAttacktype +## (zzDamage)
Space ## ft.; Reach ## ft.
Special Attacks zz, zz
Spell-Like Abilities (CL ##zz; concentration +##)
At will—zzzz
1/day—zzzz

—– Statistics —–
Str ##, Dex ##, Con ##, Int ##, Wis ##, Cha ##
Base Atk +##; CMB +## (+## zzConditionalmaneuverbonus); CMD ## (## vs. zzManeuvername)
Feats zzFeatname, zzFeatname
Skills zzSkillname +##, zzSkillname +## (+## zzCondition); Racial Modifiers +## zzSkillname, +## zzSkillname in zzCondition
Languages zzLanguage
SQ zz

—– Ecology —–
Environment zzClimate zzTerrain
Organization zz, zz, or zz
Treasure zzCategory

—– Special Abilities —–
zzName (Ex/Sp/Su) zzDescription


Here are some tips for using the above stat block, and building stat blocks in general.

## is a placeholder for a number, so an entry like “Init +##” should be something like “Init +2″ or “Init -2″ in your monster stat block.

zz is a placeholder for anything other than a number (obviously, “zzSize” means you should replace it with a game term for size, such as “Medium,” not “zzMedium”).
When you are finished, your monster stat block should not have ## or zz in it at all.

If your monster doesn’t have an ability mentioned in the sample stat block format (such as DR, SR, Immune, an “plus” effect for a melee or ranged attack, a conditional skill bonuses, or racial skill modifiers), delete that ability and its placeholders. For example, if your monster doesn’t have damage reduction, delete the “DR ##/zzMaterial” and the semicolon after it so the line starts with “Immune.”

If your monster has an ability that isn’t presented in the sample stat block format (such as Spells Known), add it to the stat block, making sure to put it in the correct section of the stat block (for example, Spells Known goes in the Offense section) and match the bold and/or italic format for that ability as shown in a printed stat block.

If the monster doesn’t have Feats, Skills, or Languages, delete the entire Feats, Skills, or Languages line.

If your monster has Space 5 ft. and Reach 5 ft., delete that entire line (the default is a monster with that size and reach).

When you are finished, your stat block shouldn’t have any “blank” entries like “DR —.”

The Defense, Offense, Statistics, and Ecology lines have “—–” at the beginning and end to visually offset those section headers. This is because the messageboard code doesn’t allow you to underline text, and this is an easy and clear way to duplicate the printed stat block format for this purpose. Do not tamper with those lines.

In a printed stat block, the individual listings for the spell-like abilities are indented, but it’s difficult to make that work in the messageboards, so if your monster has spell-like abilities, just use the non-indented format as presented in the above sample stat block.

If your monster has a new ability (such as “Arcane Vengeance” or “Eyeball Eater”), you must explain it in the Special Abilities part of the stat block.

If your monster has a common ability from the Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook (such as sneak attack) or a universal monster rule from the Bestiary or Bestiary 2 (such as grab or stench), you do not need to provide the description of that ability in the Special Abilities part of the stat block (we assume the reader knows how sneak attack, grab, and stench work, or can look them up in the appropriate book).

When in doubt as to how to format part of your stat block, check the monsters in the Bestiary and universal monster rules.

 


LEGAL STUFF:

1. Anyone can submit an entry.

2. One entry per person at any one time. An entry must be your own work, not being published previously or considered by any other publisher, and it must original and not infringe upon copyrighted material.

3. All entries become property of Adventureaweek.com, LLP.

4. By submitting an entry you authorize the use of your name and likeness without additional compensation for promotion and advertising purposes in all media.

5. Adventureaweek.com, LLP reserves the right to withdraw or terminate this endeavor at any time without prior notice.

6. All decisions of Adventureaweek.com, LLP and their arbiters are final.

7. There is no compensation provided – any entries are given freely by their creators for use by Adventureaweek.com, LLP in perpetuity.

8.  Your statblock must be properly formatted.  Please follow the directions as listed above on this page.

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Forest for the Trees & Winterflower

 

Hej everybody!

When I got to read the first couple of AaW-modules, I wasn’t too impressed – little did I know how fast the crew would evolve and improve – vastly! Today, I’ll take a look at the first two modules that made me realize that these guys have potential!

 

Forest for the Trees

This pdf is 30 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving a total of 27 pages of content, so let’s check this out!

 

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players might wish to jump to the conclusion.

 

Still here? All right! After having braved the burial mound of the Loi’Tok in Champion’s Rest, the PCs are recruited to take a look at a logger’s camp – not in the deadly Dark Woods, btw., but in the more hospitable west wood. Unfortunately, though, the Klavekian logging enterprise there also has some problems – the loggers have been warned by eerie winds and now the PCs are to look into the matter. On their way across the snow-covered fields, the characters are harassed by a pixie and her harmless shenanigans (via a new spell, btw.) and potentially annoyed, they finally reach the logging camp, only to be accosted by rather hostile, grumpy, soaked and unfriendly loggers who want to take up their work again. Hopefully, the PCs can calm down the rather unpleasant men and then be on their way to find out what the scoop is all about – possibly with an unfriendly, cocky lumberjack as an added liability and complication. It should also be noted that a whole page of hand-drawings details logging equipment to help the players and DM envision the equipment. Neat!

 

At a clearing, the PCs get a good glimpse on the repercussions of the logging operation – the ceaseless logging has actually destroyed a swath of the forest and made a pond a place of death, inhabited by one last diseased scrag, now hungry due to lack of food and rather aggressive. The desolation of this place, contrasted with the abundant wildlife and beauty of other parts of the pdf makes for a great way to drive home that the issues between the factions here are not simple. The great Hamadryad, a huge tree flanked by 6 lesser fey-trees provides the PCs with an ultimatum: Leave the forest, take the loggers with them or die.

If they complete 3 quests, she’s willing to talk further to them. The first quest has the PCs travel to a local tribe of Kobolds to acquire pickled fish. Only, the kobolds are starving and have resorted to killing a man and have actually eaten him. Whether the PCs manage to find the fish-bones and save the bones of the dead townsman, with or without violence, they’re off to the next place. In the pixie-village the PCs have to find, they are caught and tickle-tortured by the small benevolent fey, for they are losing their magical powers and don’t know why. And finally, the PCs are supposed to find a brownie-village. Here, the module becomes downright depressing and provides a vision of desolation – the tiny village has been crushed by the logs and redirected flow of water to transport the lumber. Now, only 3 confused undead brownies remain, to potentially fight the PCs or be laid to rest and carried to the great hamadryad.

 

Upon their return, the negotiations are re-opened, but without the 6 lesser dryads at the ready. It is here that the PCs will have to make a weighty decision: Do they negotiate with the wood’s guardian and get the lumber for the village and then have them evacuate the woods? Do they attack the guardian? There are also the lumberjack and a pixie as additional complicating factors to take into account…and then there’s the fact that here, there are no right choices, only consequences for both this part of the world and the PCs. If they heed the ancient Hamadryad, they preserve the sanctity of the forest, but at the cost of unemployed loggers and a stifled growth of the Klavekian colony. If the PCs kill the guardian, they will have secured work and growth for the Klavekians, but the wood will slowly die and whither to give way to a desolate wasteland. And violence by the dryads, who stand ready to attack the camp and the angry lumberjacks who may have followed the PCs is also a real possibility. I love this non-linear climax with real consequences and without any clear-cut good and evil solutions and the option to come to a solution which in the long way, prove to be a good compromise for both factions.

 

 

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, though not perfect: There e.g. are instances of homophone errors here and there (fair/fare, for example). Layout adheres to a  full color, two column standard and the artworks are ok. The pdf comes with extensive bookmarks, herolab support, but not a printer-friendly version. Generally, I did enjoy “Forest for the Trees” in that it takes a classic conflict of nature vs. civilization, shows how the conflict can influence those involved without pointing fingers and provides the PCs with a  chance to make a real difference. While not per se a perfect adventure or a revolutionary one, I did enjoy reading this adventure – the writing is excellent. All in all, I did enjoy the adventure, though the price is a bit high for the page-count when compared to similar modules by other 3pps. If you like Rybalka, you’ll love this first option to make a major decision and influence the future of the mini-setting and while I did very much enjoy this decision and the way in which the adventure handles its topics, I have to take into account that the module is light on art when compared to other, is not that long for the price and comes with rather sparse maps when compared to FGG, TPK Games or the Headless Hydra-modules and in direct comparison, feels a bit short. My final verdict can thus be “only” 3.5 stars, which however, I’ll gladly round up to 4.

 

Winter Flower

This pdf is 24 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving 21 pages of content for this adventure, so let’s take a look!

 

This being an adventure review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion!

 

Still here? All right! The annual Winterflower Dance and Festival is upon Rybalka and emotions and hormons run high: The beautiful maiden Gwendolyn has many a suitor, and three men, Nicoli Vrodle, Alem Dulgra and Vladimir Pelchonal vie for her hand with increasingly heroic quests – which, of course, the PCs can assist. Whether they assist one, two or all of the quests, they’re in for a challenge: Nicoli wants them to acquire a broach from a capsized Vikmordere ship, which is unfortunately near the location of the last adventure, “Forest for the Trees” – depending on the outcome, the PCs may have an interesting first look at the consequences of their actions as they make their way to a stranded ship. The PCs may meet a scouting party of Vikmordere on the way and when they reach the ship (with its beautiful map, unfortunately with numbers), they will have to brave the undead that now inhabit the frozen shipwreck. They might even salvage a cannon from the ship – IF they succeed in getting its massive bulk back to Rybalka, that is.

 

Unfortunately, poor Nicoli’s advances fall on deaf ears and Alem is next: Quite popular and wealthy, this unscrupulous man deals in illicit narcotics and want to secure a rare dwarven gem, Alexandrite, to effectively buy Gwendolyn’s heart. He might also prove to be a way for the PCs to get back to good graces with Rybalka after choosing the “Path of the Druid” in “Forest for the Trees”.  In order to reach the entry to the secret subterranean dwarven holds, the PCs will have to brave kobold traps and succeed at a kind of sliding puzzle (WITH a hint, this time), which comes with actual ways to find the solution without brute-forcing it – GREAT! In order to get the gem, though, the PCs will first have to get some cave-moss from a grick-infested cave. Once this task is complete as well, they may return to Rybalka, only to realize that Alem might not be a good choice for Gwendolyn – he might even be harassing her.

The strikingly handsome Vladimir has perhaps the most romantic of the three ideas – he wants to bring the Winterflower to Gwendolyn to ask for her heart – reminiscent of the tradition in the alps to bring the Edelweiß to one’s beloved, I did consider this idea in particular to be awesome. Especially with the map and location: The flower only grows on the mountain known as “Solitary Giant”, a huge thing of ice and basalt, circled by a vast snow roc. To make matters worse, the weather is taking a turn for the worse as well. Climbing the solitary giant will have the PCs brave potential avalanches and other obstacles to have an awesome climax: Fending off against the snow roc while being tied to the wall. the creature is not overtly hostile and easily confused and the objective is not victory, but survival. Hopefully, the PCs can keep brave Vladimir alive.

 

Upon their return, though, Gwendolyn may spurn Vladimir as well to follow her own choice and heart unless the PCs intervene on behalf of the brave man. Whether or not for the better, the PCs have helped a romance by showing what can and cannot be achieved by bravery, money and suaveness and thus ends the adventure and concludes the festival. Which I would have loved to see being described in the module, but oh well.

 

 

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, though not perfect – I did notice some minor glitches, though not many or glitches that impeded my understanding or enjoyment of the text. Layout adheres to Adventureaweek.com’s 2-column standard with its colored background. No printer-friendly version is included in the deal, though herolab-files are. The cartography, as I’ve come to expect from adventureaweek.com, is stellar, though I’d love for player-friendly maps sans the numbers etc. or a similar file of collated handouts as e.g. Run Amok Games provides. The pdf comes with extensive bookmarks. Of all the adventures in and around Rybalka I’ve read so far, Winter Flower is perhaps the most unconventional. A sense of personal involvement can be just as enticing as the promise of epic loot and the module provides an intriguing backdrop and interesting motivations for the players. The climactic climbing of a mountain is one of the coolest environmental showdowns I’ve read in any PFRPG adventure and feels truly unique. I do have some complaints, though: In direct comparison to other modules by adventureaweek.com and other publishers, “Winter Flower” is a bit on the short side for the price – TPK Games’Ship of Fools“, for example, provides about twice the content and multiple full-color maps for a slightly higher price. Additionally, the festival that is an integral component of the module’s background gets no description or the like. Its rites and dances could have made for a cool end and a way to convey more of the unique cultures and customs of the setting/settlement. It is due to these two gripes, especially the bang-for-buck-ratio, that I’ll settle for a final verdict of 4.5 stars.

 

Thanks for reading, as always!

Endzeitgeist out.