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Mime of the Troll Glade

troll mimeMime of the Troll Glade
XP 4,800
CE persistent haunt (50 ft. radius)
Caster Level 8th
Notice Perception DC 27 (to smell the faint lingering smell of vomit)
HP 42; Trigger proximity; Reset 1 day
Effect A ghostly troll appears as the haunt manifests. He is dressed completely in white and his face is stark white from powder, only a single black tear upon his left chin, breaks the pale monotony of his appearance. He starts to communicate with the party by miming something unclear, and ends the miming with holding his hands to his ears—then he opens his mouth and unleashes a cone of ethereal vomit. The breath weapon is a 30-foot cone (Reflex DC 19 negates) and gives the victims the nauseated condition (a Will DC 19 lowers the condition to sickened). Any conditions obtained from the haunt lasts for 1d6+2 rounds as the ethereal vomit slowly dissipates. The mime makes three such attacks over three rounds and he moves up to 20 feet each round to get a better “barfing” position.

Destruction Consecrate must be cast in the glade by a good aligned spellcaster while a bard sings the Ballad of the Trollish Mime. All participants in the ritual must wear makeup similar to the trollish mime’s.

Adventure Hook Grobblebarf was an usual troll—instead of tearing peoples arms off, he asked them to perform a piece of music or dance for him. The unfortunate ones whom could not do so were eaten, but the fortunate ones were only eaten after their performance. A lucky few were even allowed to leave, usually because Grobblebarf had eaten their companions first. The troll grew especially fond of miming (which he considered the finest artform) and spent many nights performing for his fellow trolls. Eventually this was not enough for Grobblbarf and he wanted to perform in a town instead of in the woodlands where he had his lair.

The troll acquired a hat of disguise from a traveler who tried to avoid his fate by parting with treasure (to no avail). Grobblebarf donned the hat and set off for the nearby town of Grostburg in the guise of a half-orc. While he performed, a gust of wind blew off his hat—the villagers were horrified that a troll stood in the town square. Grobblebarf was chased out of town by torch wielding mobs and an allocation of adventurers that were passing through Grostburg.

Grobblebarf was cornered in a glade where he fought for his life and his right to perform his art, but the combined might of the mobs and the experienced adventurers was too much for a lone troll and he was killed in the glade, his body burned. A year later to the day, Grobblebarf’s spirit rose from the ground and manifested for the first time when a traveling troupe of actors made their camp there—soon the word spread of the haunted glade to Grostburg and beyond.

 

Do you have a chilling idea for a haunt or cursed item? Send it along to us at submit (at) adventureaweek.com, but please, bear the following in mind before you submit anything for review:

1. Anyone can submit an entry.
2. One entry per person at any one time. An entry must be your own work, not being published previously or considered by any other publisher, and it must original and not infringe upon copyrighted material.
3. All entries become property of Adventureaweek.com, LLP.
4. By submitting an entry you authorize the use of your name and likeness without additional compensation for promotion and advertising purposes in all media.
5. Adventureaweek.com, LLP reserves the right to withdraw or terminate this endeavor at any time without prior notice.
6. All decisions of Adventureaweek.com, LLP and their arbiters are final.
7. There is no compensation provided – any entries are given freely by their creators for use by Adventureaweek.com, LLP in perpetuity.
8. Your statblock must be properly formatted (compare to similar content on the AaWBlog for correct formatting).

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Six Tips for running a Scene in Social Scenarios

 00-machines-of-war-castle-glossary-994x525

1) Small Sandbox

Most social encounters in a game happen within a very small area, which is also the case with this week’s upcoming Sidequest Saturday. The Veresovich Manor is easily laid out in your head—ballroom, several antechambers, kitchen, a dozen bedrooms, library, and so on.
First of all, decide which of these areas are off-limits for guests; the bedrooms (in which it is considered odd to see guests prowling around), the kitchen and library (where work is to be done and delicate objects stored), and so forth.
This is fine because the sandbox here doesn’t come from the area but from the multitude of NPCs within it to interact with. Do a quick outline of the rooms and layout and familiarize yourself with the statted NPCs, but most importantly, the secrets and the information that needs to be conveyed for the plot to advance. Then you are set to invite the players inside of the magnificent location of the social encounter.  

2) List of Traits for NPCs

One of my little secrets (one many people use, so not really my secret) is lists. Make a list with ten, maybe fifteen different traits that make an NPC stand out—not for characters with full statistics, but for the un-statted NPCs that the PCs are bound to interact with.

We all know the situation: “I will try to engage the servant with the tray in conversation and avoid the monocle wearing man in the tails and top hat twirling his moustache”.
Who hasn’t been caught flat-footed by a player doing the opposite of what was intended? With a list in hand, your answer will be, “the servant with the slight limp, or the servant who has been sending flirtatious smiles all night?”
It is a simple, quick, easy way to make it seem as if you have spent hours preparing for impromptu moments. Until the first question to the servant is, “what’s your name?”—oh no, they caught us flatfooted!
Or did they? Read on…

Old_book_bindings3) Lists and More Lists

My biggest problem was always names. In one game I played in, we visited the Hansons on a farm and their neighbors the Jonas brothers lived on the next property. The GM did not do it on purpose, but Hanson and Jonas were the names that popped up!
Make a list of first names and surnames, and mark them off as you use them. This can be used throughout the whole campaign! In the next sidequest a list of titles will come in handy, just remember there can be more barons at the same location, but most likely only one captain of the guard in any given city.

4) Flexibility

This is an important one—when the PCs avoid the dastardly looking moustache-twirling man, don’t worry; remember the first tip! Familiarize yourself with the information needed to advance the plot. It doesn’t always matter who conveys the information so long as the adventurers get it—use your own NPC created from the lists you’ve compiled and the players will be none the wiser.

00-Knight-and-Hermit-q25-1600x12005) Roleplay

Go overboard! These social encounters will be more memorable if the party met Baron von Shnozzult, who ends every sentence with a nasal laugh, or Mrs Plushkin who goes teary-eyed every time she mentions her deceased small dog Dougy (which happens often). The adventurers may like the moustache twirling man, but he has been done so many times—imagine a villain driven by a desire to raise her only companion, Dougy; weird and freaky.

Don’t be afraid to roleplay some of the mannerisms of the NPCs—it will also help yourself to distinguish between the cast of characters as the adventurers interact with the wide circle of people available to them. The social encounter is the GM’s chance to seed and implement a plethora of different roleplaying situations, so enjoy it!

6) Sounds and smells

Finally the devil is in the details—remember the sounds and smells at any gathering of folks; music, food, and alcoholic beverages among them, to name a few. These can all be used to lure a PC away from their fellow adventurers should the need arise, but between the retinue of encapsulating sensations and the small sandbox only a very paranoid party will not take the bait and fall to the temptation to go on a little exploring of their own (especially rogues and mischievous characters).

 

Do you have a contribution or idea for Meta Thursdays?  Send us your ideas (after reading the submission guidelines) to submit(at)adventureaweek.com with “Meta Thursday” in the subject line!

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Rain of Blood

blood rain maybeRain of Blood     CR 9
XP 6,400

NE haunt (manifestation) (100 ft. radius)
Caster Level 10th
Notice Perception DC 30 (to notice the rolling rain clouds have a blood red hue)
Hp 18; Trigger special (see text); Reset 1 day
Effect     The thunder heralds rain but when the first drops fall, it becomes apparent that the skies are in fact shedding acidic blood. When this haunt manifests the dangerous precipitation lasts for three rounds damaging all organic matter (creatures and plants, but not objects), after which the rain returns to a normal, non-lethal downpour. On the first round the rain deals 6d6 acid damage, on the second round the deluge increases and deals 8d6 acid damage, and on the third round 10d6 acid damage finishes the manifestation (DC 22 Reflex saves to halve damage each round). Full cover entirely negates the damage and a creature wearing the amulet of the sundered heart, cloak of the dark servant or mask of the thirst is immune to the haunt.

Destruction      A manifestation is indestructible permanently unless the entity behind it is slain or banished back to whatever realm they came from. To read more about the Exsanguinator and how to bring an end to his malevolence, keep reading the AaWBlog as more of Cultus Sanguineus is revealed!

Adventure Hook     This manifestation represents the Exsanguinator’s desires to see the world covered in blood. His rage over imprisonment makes the rain acidic and his manifestations are increasing in power as the seals of his interdimensional cage are further weakened by the machinations of his minions.

 

Do you have a chilling idea for a haunt or cursed item? Send it along to us at submit (at) adventureaweek.com, but please, bear the following in mind before you submit anything for review:

1. Anyone can submit an entry.
2. One entry per person at any one time. An entry must be your own work, not being published previously or considered by any other publisher, and it must original and not infringe upon copyrighted material.
3. All entries become property of Adventureaweek.com, LLP.
4. By submitting an entry you authorize the use of your name and likeness without additional compensation for promotion and advertising purposes in all media.
5. Adventureaweek.com, LLP reserves the right to withdraw or terminate this endeavor at any time without prior notice.
6. All decisions of Adventureaweek.com, LLP and their arbiters are final.
7. There is no compensation provided – any entries are given freely by their creators for use by Adventureaweek.com, LLP in perpetuity.
8. Your statblock must be properly formatted (compare to similar content on the AaWBlog for correct formatting).